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1 in 26: Introduction - a Video provided by Epilepsy Association of Western and Central PA

This unscripted video is part of our 1 in 26 series and shares information about epilepsy and seizures, directly from the individuals and families affected by them. Learn how to recognize seizures and how to help someone if they are having one.

1 in 26: What Everyone Should Know - a Video provided by Epilepsy Assoication of Western and Central PA

This video is part of our 1 in 26 series and highlights what people with epilepsy and their families think that everyone should know about epilepsy.

1 in 26: Epilepsy in Our Own Words - a Video provided by Epilepsy Association of Western and Central PA

This video is part of our 1 in 26 series.

Loyola Medicine doctors collaborate to relieve patient of chronic epilepsy

Erika Fleck was suffering chronic epileptic seizures due to a small area of scar tissue in a structure of her brain called the hippocampus. Loyola epileptologist Jorge Asconapé, MD, recommended surgery to remove the scar tissue. Neurosurgeon Douglas Anderson, MD, performed the surgery, called an amygdalohippocampectomy. Ms. Fleck hasn’t had a single seizure in the more than three years since her surgery.

Veterans & Epilepsy: Basic Training: Epilepsy and TBI

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration: This program explains the link between Traumatic Brain Injury and epilepsy and the complicated struggle to deal with epilepsy while simultaneously trying to recover from traumatic brain and other injuries. www.epilepsy.va.gov

Veterans & Epilepsy: Basic Training: Diagnosis

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration: This program explains how epilepsy is diagnosed. In most cases, a person who has repeated seizures will visit a doctor called a neurologist. The neurologist will conduct a thorough history and a neurological exam and may order tests -- such as an MRI or an EEG -- to help him or her make a diagnosis. In some cases, people need further study in a specialized part of the hospital called the epilepsy monitoring unit.

Veterans and Epilepsy: Basic Training: Psychosocial Issues

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration: This program describes the various psychosocial issues that sometimes accompany epilepsy. People with uncontrolled seizures may not be able to drive. They may not be able to hold the jobs that they want. They may feel a profound sense of loss. They may be depressed. They may feel isolated. This program explains that such feelings are normal, that treatment is available, and that things usually get better.

Veterans and Epilepsy: Basic Training: Medications

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration: This program describes the various medications that can be used to treat epilepsy. It includes an explanation of how the drugs work, how effective they are, and how clinicians decide which medications to use for a particular patient. It also discusses common and serious side effects, the importance of taking anti-epileptic medications as prescribed, and strategies to help patients take their medicines when and how they should.

Veterans and Epilepsy: Basic Training: Seizure First Aid

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration: This video program explains how to keep a person safe during a seizure and how to provide first aid afterwards.

Veterans and Epilepsy: Basic Training: Introduction to Epilepsy & the Epilepsy Centers of Excellence

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration: This video covers Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures or PNES. PNES resembles epilepsy -- the seizures can look very much like epileptic seizures – but it is caused by psychological issues, rather than abnormal electrical impulses in the brain.

Veterans and Epilepsy: Basic Training: Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration: This video covers Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures or PNES. PNES resembles epilepsy -- the seizures can look very much like epileptic seizures – but it is caused by psychological issues, rather than abnormal electrical impulses in the brain.

Veterans and Epilepsy: Basic Training: Surgical Interventions

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration:Medications are very effective in controlling seizures for most people with epilepsy. If medications don’t work, it may be possible to control a person’s seizures by removing a small part of the brain from which his or her seizures originate.

Veterans and Epilepsy: Basic Training: Women's Issues

Video provided by Veterans Health Administration: To educate Veterans about how epilepsy and anti-epileptic drugs affect reproductive issues such as fertility, birth control, pregnancy, fetal development, and menopause.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: How can I learn the cause of my child's epilepsy?

In the first part of the series, we explore how to find out the cause of your child’s epilepsy with pediatric neurologist, Dr. Marissa DiGiovine.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: Why is in important to know the cause of my child's epilepsy?

In this part of the series, we learn the benefits and importance of finding out the cause of your child’s epilepsy with pediatric epileptologist, Dr. John Millichap.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: What are the different causes of epilepsy?

There are many different reasons your child could be having seizures. In this part of the series, Dr. Marissa Digiovine, pediatric neurologist, discusses the many reasons your child could have epilepsy.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: How do I advocate for genetic testing for my child?

Wanting to know the cause of your child’s epilepsy is normal but the cause may not be clear. Genetic testing could provide the answer. In this part of the series, Tami Reynolds, genetic counselor, discusses how you can advocate for genetic testing for your child.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: How do I know if genetic testing is right for me?

Although genetic testing is a way to find the cause of your genetic testing, it isn’t necessarily right for every family. In this part of the series, Tami Reynolds, genetic counselor, discusses how you will know if genetic testing is right for your family.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: We haven't been able to find the genetic cause of our epilepsy. Now what?

While genetic testing may provide some answers as to why your child has epilepsy, it doesn’t always give the cause. In this part of the series, Dr. Shavonne Massey, pediatric neurologist, lets us know that we should never give up hope as science and medicine are always advancing.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: Whare are some pros and conts of genetic testing?

Genetic testing is right for some families but not for others. In this part of the series, Tami Reynolds, genetic counselor, talks about pros and cons to genetic testing.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: I have a genetic diagnosis, but there isn't a treatment. Now what?

Finding the cause of your child’s epilepsy can be beneficial. However, it can also be daunting when there isn’t a treatment. In this part of the series, Dr. Shavonne Massey, pediatric neurologist, talks about how to maintain hope as science and medicine are always evolving.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: Are all seiizure convulsive in children?

Seizures can look different in children. Some are visible but some are harder to identify. In this part of the series, Dr. John Millichap, pediatric epileptologist, discusses the various ways that seizures may present in children.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: My child has epilepsy, but the bigger challengs i the develpomental and behavioral symptoms. What can I do and who can help?

Epilepsy is just one challenge that families face. Often, developmental, and behavioral challenges can be just as challenging. In this part of the series, Dr. Shavonne Massey gives strategies that you can take to get additional support in these areas.

Child Neurology Foundation - Shortening the Diagnostic Odyssey: How do I know if a starting spell is ADHD or absence seizures?

Absence seizures can often be misdiagnosed as ADHD. In this part of the series, Dr. John Millichap, pediatric epileptologist, explains how you will know the difference.

Ingrid Casanova - Your Star

Aquí les dejo mi primer tema musical "Tu Estrella" canción inspirada en éstos tiempos , a los pacientes de Epilepsia; en especial a mi hija Isabella y a mi hijo Alexander que se gradúa como doctor en Quiropráctica y todos los graduados 2020. Gracias a la Sociedad Puertorriqueña de Epilepsia por adoptar este tema y hacerlo suyo. #epilepsia #cantautora

What it's Like - Epilepsy Awareness

What is a Seizure Action Plan - and Why is it Important?

A seizure is a medical emergency. A Seizure Action Plan (SAP) contains tailored guidelines on how to respond during a seizure, based on the patient’s medical history. It includes health and medical information specific to the patient and helps others recognize seizures and the appropriate steps to take to keep him or her safe from injury or damage caused by prolonged seizures.

Weighing Epilepsy Surgery as a Potential Treatment Option for Patients: Scott Perry, MD

Scott Perry, MD, an attendee from the 2022 American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting, held December 2023 in Nashville, Tennessee, sat down with NeurologyLive® for an interview to discuss the biggest unknowns with epilepsy surgery, the debates surrounding when it a good option versus not, and what the goal of the surgery is for the patient.